Tag Archives: podcast

Joycean Day Drinking

I guested on a podcast called tipsyturvy Ulysses, and I had a lot of fun drinking a cocktail in the afternoon and chattering about James Joyce’s Ulysses, a book I have not read.

https://anchor.fm/eric-lewis39/episodes/Scylla-and-Charybdis-The-quaker-librarian-purred-e1l6vec/a-a88feds

You might wonder why I would guest on a podcast about a book I never read, and you would be right to wonder. tipsyturvy Ulysses is for people who have not read Ulysses but would like to take the plunge into the infuriating book, and the section of the book which takes place in a library made the hosts think of me.

Okay, that’s not the only reason they asked me. These hosts, Eric and Wendy, have also had me in each of their classrooms to teach podcast composition, a one-shot instruction session I’ve developed for the ENGL1101 and 1102 classes; in this episode, they blame/credit me with planting the seed for their own podcast.

cf. Lost in the Stacks, Episode 513: How To Read A Book In Which Nothing Happens

Supercontext: From Hell

This graphic novel by Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell came out between 1989 and 1998, 100 years after the Jack the Ripper murders it’s based on. We look at the meticulous research they put into this to try to understand how this story manages to be about true crime while indulging in deep themes like English identity, psychogeography, and the nature of time.

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Supercontext: Heat

This 1995 film by Michael Mann is considered a quintessential cops-and-robbers epic. We look at Mann’s attention to detail and his attempt at authenticity in light of the movie’s influence on audiences, filmmakers, and real-life criminals.

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Supercontext: Hounds of Love

This 1985 concept album by Kate Bush is split into pop songs and a suite of music about someone drowning. We look at Bush’s career arc leading up to this record and how the support she received from those around her allowed to experiment and create this wholly unique music.

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Supercontext: Hyperion

Dan Simmon’s 1989 science-fiction novel is acclaimed for its unique structure, references, and style. We take a closer look at how it interrogates our expectations of genre to explore a complex host of themes. Thank you to Chris Marlton for coproducing this episode.

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Supercontext: Withnail & I

This 1987 film is celebrated as a cult classic for its depiction of self-destructive young Englishmen at the end of the 1960s. We discuss how creator Bruce Robinson got it made, and whether it congratulates its characters for their alcoholism or criticizes their generation and the end of that era of British culture.

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Supercontext: We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

This 1962 novel is being reappraised by critics and fans as a creeping meditation on 1950s housewives, agoraphobia, and good old-fashioned New England persecution.

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Supercontext: Lone Wolf and Cub

This epic 1970s manga series is celebrated for its influence on other stories. We look at the conditions that produced it and how the comic represents Japanese history, revenge, gender, and the irredeemable hero on the road to Hell.

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Supercontext: Fly By Night

This 1975 rock album began to define Rush’s identity after the late Neil Peart joined the band on drums and lyrics. We look at how they treated their band as a business to try to understand the particular blend of instrument solos and libertarian ideology that later defined them.

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