Tag Archives: Alan Moore

Supercontext: The Prisoner


This 1967 British TV show is revered as a cult classic that was radical and countercultural, while symbolizing philosophical arguments about individualism vs. collectivism. We take a deeper look at star Patrick McGoohan and the commercial interests behind the show to ask if it’s ultimately more conservative than pop culture likes to remember.

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Supercontext: Miracleman: A Dream of Flying


This deconstruction of the superhero genre was mired in legal debacles and intellectual property battles for decades before we could get a chance to read it. We look at that convoluted history, in light of Alan Moore’s attempt to reimagine and criticize the themes of superhero comics.

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Supercontext: The Shelf Life of Movies


Past guest Swain Hunt (Sidebar, The Metronome) returns to discuss what makes movies hold up? We each tackle a film from the last 30 years of cinema and try to understand why they hold up for us: Bull Durham, Contact and V For Vendetta.

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Supercontext: Enigma


Why is Peter Milligan and Duncan Fegredo’s ENIGMA the “lost classic” of Vertigo Comics? We talk about how this unique story asks readers to confront from their own identities.

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Supercontext: DC Rebirth Special


Charlie and Christian examine DC Comics’ latest attempt to reinvent their publishing line. Is it really about defeating despair with hope, as writer/executive Geoff Johns has said? And is this friendly to new readers? We also look at the ethical implications of using characters from “Watchmen” in an attempt to create a shared universe with an emotionally compelling narrative.

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Supercontext: Alan Moore & Jacen Burrows’ NEONOMICON


Alan Moore and Jacen Burrows’ horror graphic novel NEONOMICON is explicit, graphically violent, and filled with rape scenes. But is there something more to this award-winning HP Lovecraft homage/critique? And should it be banned from libraries?

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